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Mind to Movement

A one-to-one personalised behaviour change service to support inactive people living with dementia to increase their readiness to be active and to find ways to increase their daily activity.

How does it work?

  • The service would be provided by a professional trained in behaviour change techniques and motivational interviewing.
  • The initial introductory session (~1 hour) would aim to explore and build readiness and confidence, exchange information, explore concerns, goals and options, and develop a collaborative plan including goal-setting and relapse prevention.
  • This would be followed by ongoing support, if appropriate, or if the person is ready to become active by themselves, they could be signposted to resources to support them to do so in their own team.
  • Conversations could be guided by resources (for example, something like the ‘Do it Diary’) as a framework.
  • Professionals would have a menu of local physical activity opportunities to signpost to and would support the individual to decide what is right for them. This could be in terms of building activity into their daily life through both unstructured and structured activities, depending on the person’s needs and preferences.
  • The service should be available to everyone at the point of diagnosis to provide post-diagnostic support. Both professional referral and self-referral pathways would need to be available.
  • The service could be delivered face-to-face or online through video or phone calls by professionals (for example, dementia advisors within memory clinics or specialists on a helpline).

How does it benefit people affected by dementia?

  • Provides means of personalised care planning to support people with dementia to live well. Provides motivation, changes perceptions, and addresses fears, anxieties and other barriers.
  • Ongoing support enables new support resources to be identified as an individual’s situation changes during their dementia journey.

Questions for you (don't worry if you can't answer them all)

  • How much do you like this idea (from 1-10, 10 being high)?
  • Is there anything that exists like this already?
  • Who would provide this? What type of professionals and which organisations?
  • What would be the best format for delivery?
  • How could we make this cost-effective?
  • What are the risks associated with this approach? How could we overcome these?
  • How do you see this being sustainable?
  • What do you think of the name – any other ideas for the name?
  • Any additional thoughts or comments?


edited on Apr 4, 2022 by Natasha Howard-Murray
Public (3)
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Penny Giles 2 months ago

One to one support is always a lovely thing resulting in bespoke support plans. This sounds like a signposting service similar to a social prescriber and I wonder if there is enough difference to make it stand out. Could the person providing the one to one advice also deliver some activity?

Professionals would have a menu of local physical activity opportunities to signpost to and would support the individual to decide what is right for them. This could be in terms of building activity into their daily life through both unstructured and structured activities, depending on the person’s needs and preferences.

Regarding the statement below the professionals will not be able to signpost individuals if there is no dementia friendly activities available.

sorry I should have said statement above

Patrick O'Halloran 2 months ago

I would be concerned that this is too reliant on individuals being available, competent and funded to deliver these services and that that may be patchy across the country and variable in terms of how long it lasts.

I would also worry that it will not work out as a very cost effective option.