Alzheimer's Society Innovation Hub

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Innovation Project Selection (Autumn 2019)

34 Ideas
519 Votes
89 Comments
213 Subscribers

 

We want to tackle the biggest challenges facing people with dementia as well as their families and carers. But what barriers do people face?

We will use your suggestions and votes to decide what challenge our Innovation Team will tackle in our next innovation sprint. Your thoughts will help us make a real difference to people affected by dementia on an issue that truly matters. 

Please vote for the three challenges that you think have the biggest impact for people with dementia, their families and carers.

Add your comments to tell us how much difference tackling each challenge could make, whether it’s something that could help you, or ask any questions you have.

Now that submissions of new challenges have closed, we would like you to vote and comment on the shortlisted challenges. You have until 5pm on the 11th of November.

The Innovation Team will select the most promising challenge after 11th November and start working on it right away.

Please vote and comment on the eight challenges listed below.

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Tell us the challenges that people face.
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This is the challenge that the Innovation Team will tackle in our next sprint project.

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Top Contributors

  1. Natalie Marchant
    286 pts
  2. Ciara Lihou
    270 pts
  3. David Latcham
    230 pts
  4. Danielle Coombes
    226 pts
  5. Katie Cartwright
    215 pts

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Idea thumbnail

For lots of people with dementia, particularly in rural areas, their car is the key to their independence. When their dementia progresses to the point where they can't drive anymore, it can limit their ability to engage with the world around them. They may no longer be able to do their own shopping, visit friends, go to hospital appointment, continue hobbies etc. It might also place a strain on their friends and family who step-in to give them lifts. Public and community transport can be...

Ciara Lihou
by Ciara Lihou
27 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 12
Ciara Lihou
Idea thumbnail

I know that a lot of people with more advanced dementia struggle with continence. This is an issue that affects people’s dignity, is a barrier to living well with dementia. It can present both problems for carers, families and friends and health problems if people who are incontinent continually need to clean themselves up. Talking Point has a lot of examples of this and it clearly takes a toll on everyone involved. If this a solution could be found for this I think it would be a huge step...

Danielle Coombes
by Danielle Coombes
39 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 8
Danielle Coombes
Idea thumbnail

For those without dementia it is difficult to understand the daily challenges and without this understanding, how can society truly become dementia friendly. Can we create something that allows people to "walk in the shoes" of someone with dementia, allowing them to have a clearer idea of what it might be like to experience dementia. One way to do this could be through virtual reality, and there may be other ways to build this kind of empathy and understanding too. This could be helpful...

Katie Cartwright
by Katie Cartwright
27 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 9
Katie Cartwright
Idea thumbnail

Conversations around end of life are not easy. For the person with a diagnosis they are scary, confusing, and potentially depressing. For the family they can be awkward, especially if they are trying to put a positive face on for the person they support. Sometimes professionals are useful people to talk to, or sometimes they are strangers who people feel they don't want to share such personal things with. For many, it's easier not to have these conversations at all.   However...

David Latcham
by David Latcham
40 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 11
David Latcham
Idea thumbnail

Whilst statutory maternity leave and compassionate leave for childcare responsibilities is readily and frequently recognised by employers no such consideration is given to those of us with Elder Care responsibilities.   Approximately 70% of all carers are women.  With the Statutory Retirement Age increasing, very significantly for women, in the past few years many of us face the challenge of trying to work whilst also trying to provide support and care for our elderly parents with...

Caroline M. Robinson
by Caroline M. Robinson
25 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 4
Caroline M. Robinson
Idea thumbnail

My amazing mother has been totally blind since the age of six (when caught in an explosion) and has always been our families’ phone directory, memory bank and font of all knowledge - inspired by the daily storytelling of radio she has always been full of joy and hope. Now in her 80s, she relies on Alexa to answer her growing number of daily questions and is finding herself “getting lost in her head” as her Alzheimer’s progresses. I cannot find any information to help people caring for...

Alexander Watson
by Alexander Watson
13 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 7
Alexander Watson
Idea thumbnail

Mum refuses to get out of bed and mobilise, wash herself, get showered, wash hair, personal care for nails hands and feet, wearing pads, getting out of bed to allow changing soiled bed linen, up to twice a day. Mum says she is entitled to stay in bed if wants to as at 89 years of age she can do what she wants. Mum sleeps mostly during the day but has sleepless nights, gets up at night moves furniture, draw curtains, etc. Any suggestions to help encourage mum with personal care etc?

Julie Barrett
by Julie Barrett
20 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 6
Julie Barrett
Idea thumbnail

Living with dementia involves struggles with activities of daily life.  My dad, who has Parkinson’s dementia, said “everyone focuses on my dementia, but they don't think about all the other difficulties that go along with it". Dressing is one of these difficulties that he increasingly struggles with – every morning, every evening and throughout the day.  He has less dexterity to fasten buttons and zips, and difficulty reaching his arms above his head, finding sleeves in his shirts and...

Natalie Marchant
by Natalie Marchant
52 Votes
Voting
Closed
Comments 15
Natalie Marchant